All Posts from 2016

Soybeans are a major crop in countries including the U.S., Brazil, Argentina, India and China. It is also grown in some Canadian provinces and in smaller acreages in Asia and South Africa. And now Soybeans are being introduced as a crop in other parts of Africa.

While farmers harvest bean seeds, soybeans are grown for their oil and protein—those are the two end products. The oil is edible and has many industrial uses. The crude protein...

I recently read an article by Gary Schnitkey on farmdoc in regard to the relative decline of soybean yields in Illinois compared to corn yields. Many agronomists around the state, me included, have been bemoaning these stagnant yields for the last decade. Gary makes a great point about how growers have neglected innovation in soybean production while...

In Northern Illinois we have had another interesting year with soybeans. We have had some great soybeans, some good soybeans and some fields that were just beans. Over the next few months we will try to dig in and see what made our great soybeans great and what caused some of our fields to just be beans. There are, however, a few things on the surface that we have already learned.

We had pockets of an issue that we have not paid enough...

URBANA, Ill. – Herbicides applied in the fall often can provide improved control of many winter annual weed species compared with similar applications made in the spring. Marestail is a prime example. More and more Illinois marestail populations are resistant to herbicides, including glyphosate and ALS-inhibiting products. University of Illinois weed scientist Aaron Hager recommends targeting emerged marestail with higher application rates of...

Weather
The weather in 2016 set up the potential for some very high soybean yields in many areas of Illinois and to be honest, some have reported the highest soybean yields they have ever had on their farms. But, the weather could have led to yield variability and some problems that I have termed “www”.

Weeds
The number one issue that occurred this year appeared to be weed competition. With...

Soybean seeding depth from 1 to 1.5 inches has long been considered optimal. But that recommendation is changing to “deeper is better”, but only in the right soil conditions.

I wrote a blog for the ILSoyAdvisor a while back that pointed out soybeans can be planted at a depth of 1.75 to 2.25 inches into soil that has more consistent moisture and...

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