Funded by the Illinois Soybean Association checkoff program.

Debra Levey Larson

Agronomy: Soybean Stocks Estimate to be Overshadowed by Planting Intentions?

URBANA, Ill. – The USDA’s estimate of Dec. 1, 2014, stocks of U.S. soybeans was surprisingly small, according to University of Illinois agricultural economist Darrel Good. Based on the estimated size of the 2014 crop and estimates of exports and domestic crush during the previous quarter, the stocks estimate implied a record-large residual use of soybeans during the first quarter (September-November) of the 2014-15 marketing year. The USDA provides an estimate of seed and residual use of soybeans for the marketing year, but does not estimate seed and residual use on a quarterly basis. “Historically, those quarterly estimates were [...]

By |April 17, 2015|

Disease Management: Research: Climate Change Fosters Charcoal Rot

With over 100 diseases that can attack soybean crops, why would charcoal rot rise to the top of the most wanted list? University of Illinois scientists cite the earth’s changing climate as one reason that more research is needed on the fungus that causes charcoal rot. Fungi may often be associated with cool, damp growing conditions but Macrophomina phaseolina, the fungus that causes charcoal rot, prefers hot and dry drought conditions. “As the climate continues to change and we see more extremes in the weather, including hotter, drier summers, this fungus will have more favorable conditions to gain a [...]

By |July 13, 2014|

Agronomy: How Many Acres of Soybeans are Needed?

This article originally appeared in University of Illinois’ ACES College Agriculture News and has been reposted with permission. URBANA, Ill. – The USDA’s survey of U.S. crop producers last month revealed intentions to plant 81.493 million acres of soybeans this year. That is 3.765 million more than reported as planted or intended to be planted in June of last year, 4.96 million more than actually planted in 2013, and 4.042 million more than the previous record acreage in 2009. Planting intentions exceed last year’s acreage in every major soybean state except Missouri, with the largest increases reported for Minnesota, Nebraska, and [...]

By |April 23, 2014|
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