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  • Upcoming Webinar: Advantages to Participating in the Illinois Soybean Yield Challenge
    Join ILSoyAdvisor April 4 at 10 a.m. for "Advantages to Participating in the Illinois Soybean Yield Challenge" with Bob Wells, Illinois Yield Challenge Coordinator. Wells, will take a look back at the history the program,tips on how to improve your yield and set your own records, and review the 2019 Yield Challenge structure and how to enter.
  • Bringing Soil Back to Life
    We lose .3 percent of our global food production capacity each year to soil erosion and degradation. That might not sound like a lot but in 100 years that equates to 30 percent. Is there anything we can do to reverse soil erosion?

ILSoyAdvisor Weekly Updates

  • STORIES FROM THE FIELD
    SHOWCASE FARMER: DAVID DROSTE
    Environmental challenge. Droste’s farm is located in the Kaskaskia watershed in southwestern Illinois. Area soils and topography contribute to concerns about erosion and phosphorous loss. Most of the land he farms is comprised of silt loams with low organic matter with clay-based subsoils. According to Droste, the challenge in farming these soils is that water does not percolate through them very well, so most water runs off with surface drainage.
  • STORIES FROM THE FIELD
    SHOWCASE FARMER: THOMAS KENTNER
    The farmer. Tom Kentner and his son grow corn and soybeans on their 1,100-acre farm in Danville, Illinois. Kentner has more than 30 years of experience in the fertilizer business, and conservation has always been an interest of his.
  • STORIES FROM THE FIELD
    SHOWCASE FARMER: DOUG SCHROEDER
    The farmer. Doug Schroeder farms 4,000 acres of soybeans and corn in McLean County, Ill. About half the corn acreage is devoted to seed corn production for major seed companies.
  • STORIES FROM THE FIELD
    SHOWCASE FARMER: JIM MARTIN
    The farmer. Jim Martin farms about 440 acres of corn and soybeans near Wenona, Ill. Nearly half of that land has been in the family since his German ancestors homesteaded the area five generations earlier. He attributes the quality of the soils on the farm to his family’s care for the soil across generations. “As a family, we have a commitment to preserving the high-quality soils we farm.”
  • STORIES FROM THE FIELD
    SHOWCASE FARMER: KYLE WINKELMANN
    The farmer. Kyle Winkelmann and his wife, ISA director Carrie Winkelmann, produce corn and soybeans on a 2,000 acre family farm near Talulla, Ill.

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