All Posts from 2021

Scott Eversgerd, CCA Soy Envoy and Pioneer field agronomist, joins the podcast this month to discuss double-cropping soybeans and what growers can do to maximize yields on those acres. He provides tips to help get the crop off to a good start and also gives an update on wheat crop harvest conditions. 

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To view current U.S. drought conditions, check out the Current U.S. Drought Monitor Conditions for Illinois

 

The U.S. Drought Monitor (USDM) is updated each Thursday to show the location and intensity of drought across the country. The map shows drought conditions across Illinois using a five-category system, from Abnormally Dry (D0) conditions to Exceptional...

The 2021 planting season ran long again this year, starting in late March and continuing into early June. Most growers may schedule their summer or task out by calendar; however, a weed seed plans its unwanted arrival based off growing degree unit, or GDU (heat), and how soon the pre-emerge soybean residual gives up. This means that very soon, it’s going to become difficult to complete post-emergence in crop herbicide application, especially...

Scouting has become a historical activity in many areas and has been replaced with a drive-by at 15 MPH. Yes, if one can see green rows across the field it may seem as if the crop is developing nicely. However, as they say, the devil is in the details. So now that I have piqued your interest in wanting to go walk a soybean field, now what? Below are some items of what to look for and track.

1. Stand...

Wheat harvest will begin in the southern-most tip of Illinois in just a matter of days, and double crop soybean planting will be right behind it. For many years, it was widely accepted that this crop of beans was just a bonus and that counting on any bushels from this crop was risky. We have discovered that with a few management tweaks and attention to detail, these acres can yield extremely well and will often compete with full season beans...

Through my lifelong experiences in agriculture and as a beekeeper, I have sometimes observed conflict between my fellow apiarists and row-crop farmers. For legitimate reasons, beekeepers are very protective of their apiaries, and farmers need crop protection products to battle pests in their fields.  These two goals can sometimes lead to conflict, with beekeepers worrying about the health of their colonies and farmers viewing managed beehives...

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