All Posts from February 2018

Sulfur (S) is becoming a more deficient nutrient, following phosphorus and potassium. Alfalfa and corn producers are already adding sulfur into their fertility program. Should we be including sulfur in our fertility program for high yield soybeans?

Sulfur deficiency symptoms include stunted plants; pale green color indicating nitrogen deficiency except chlorosis is apparent on upper leaves while nitrogen deficiency appears first in...

New research funded by the Illinois Soybean Association (ISA) checkoff program is looking at cover crops, including winter wheat, as potential aids in the battle against soybean cyst nematode (SCN). The study builds on previous trials in Illinois and Kentucky that showed promise for use of cover crops to reduce SCN egg populations.

In the mid-1990s, a University of Kentucky study indicated no-tilling soybeans into wheat stubble...

This article was originally published on Wallaces Farmer.

There is no magic recipe for your cash crops. They require trial, error and a great deal of attention.

Cover crops are the same way! There is not a prescription.

But once you understand the guiding principles and strategic mindset for your cover cropping plan, you’ll achieve much greater success...

In times when prices are low and margins are tight, the search for on-farm profitability becomes a bigger pressure than ever. In collaboration with the University of Illinois, ISA put on a series of events this winter centered on the topic of making farmers smarter and more profitable business managers.

The Resilient Farmer Roadshow was held at five locations across the state of Illinois Feb. 13 – 22 and utilized speakers from Compeer...

Tim Smith from Cropsmith and Fred Below, Ph.D., from the University of Illinois, discuss their research on applying nitrogen on soybeans, when it makes sense to use it, the optimal timing and application rates and what role soil plays in providing additional nitrogen.

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Reading a soil test report is a good skill to have, even if someone else is writing recommendations.

When a soil sample is submitted to a commercial laboratory they usually analyze pH (water and buffer), organic matter, phosphorus, potassium, calcium and magnesium. And, if requested, they will run sulfur, nitrate and micronutrients including boron, copper, iron, manganese and zinc.

Water pH: This is a...

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