All Posts from September 2017

The ILSoyAdvisor Yield Challenge harvest is underway as growers begin combining their crops. In the first week of the Yield Challenge we have already received multiple entries breaking 100 bushels per acre! As we wait for all entries to be harvested and yield calculations to be verified by Illinois State University, it’s interesting (and exciting) to see such high yields from multiple...

Volunteer wheat is probably the number one potential weed problem in double-crop soybeans.

Most often in double-crop soybeans herbicides are needed to control existing weeds prior to or at planting in wheat straw. Often there will be broadleaf weeds or some grasses growing by the time the soybeans are planted. This burndown application frequently is made with a paraquat or glyphosate chemical. However, it only controls the weeds...

I am going to date myself but, when working at the University of Illinois Plant Clinic during graduate school, I can remember finding these strange brown/yellow blotches or symptoms near veins on soybean leaves submitted to the Clinic. After further investigation, we knew these symptoms were not caused by bacteria or fungus. Nancy Pataky, former U of I Plant Clinic diagnostician, would collect the leaves and take them to various specialists (...

As we approach harvest this year, it’s a good time to reflect on what happened during the season. It was an extremely trying year for planting and for implementing a successful weed control program.

As I drive past fields up and down the state, there are many weed control failures still affecting our fields moving into harvest. Most of the weed problems I notice are giant ragweed, waterhemp and marestail. Growers need to consider...

African soybean producer wants to know if he should be applying nitrogen to his soybeans.

ILSoyAdvisor, ISA’s soybean management website, has global reach. We get emails from around the globe asking basic questions about soybean production and management practices. Our answers often have to be pretty basic as well, with some background information included. It is always fun to receive and answer these emails and help these growers...

The words green stem syndrome should shoot shivers down your spine. Generally, most producers have experienced this phenomenon where the soybean plant is fully mature but the stem of the plant remains green, making combining difficult. So, what exactly is green stem syndrome?

Green stem syndrome (GSS) is a soybean disorder in which the main stem of the plant remains green after pods and seeds are fully mature. In some cases, leaves can...

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