All Posts from June 2017

May was a wet month with frequent rains and very little drying and June is shaping up to be fairly similar. Of course, all this cool and wet weather is good for soybean growth and rows will canopy over. However, this wet and humid weather could be setting growers up for a risk of white mold.

White mold is a fungal disease that occurs infrequently and requires a unique set of conditions in order to appear. White mold is caused by ...

In 2016 many states saw a rapid increase in acres planted to dicamba-tolerant soybeans. Many of these states experienced numerous cases of dicamba off-target movement due to vapor-drift, physical drift, tank-contamination and/or use of an improper dicamba formulation. In this article we will focus on how to identify dicamba symptomology on non-dicamba-tolerant soybeans and the estimated yield impact of an off-target application of dicamba to...

Wheat harvest will be early this year, so now is the time to think about what soybeans varieties you want to double-crop after wheat. 

Historically, many farmers have thought of double-cropping soybeans after wheat as a gamble. Wheat harvest used to happen close to the first week of July and planting soybeans after that July harvest date was risky due to weather concerns and stand difficulties.  Before the advent of patented, protected...

If you are using Liberty® herbicide on soybeans this season, you need to be aware of some updates to the label.

Following are new directions for application on soybeans:
• 43 oz./acre single application
• 87 oz./acre total annually

Label changes are highlighted in yellow below.

 ...

It’s another record year for soybean acres planted, as 10 - 15 percent of planned corn acres were shifted to soybeans due to the spring weather conditions. This record doesn’t come without challenges, though. Many of those acres will need special attention throughout the growing season.

Agronomy sales specialist Dawn Kielsmeier talks late-planted soybeans and how to best manage this year’s crop for a successful growing season.

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Growers have been asking about applying nitrogen (N) to soybeans. Soybeans have been shown to require more nitrogen than corn; roughly 5 lbs. per bushel, while corn requires only 1 lb. And 60-bushel soybeans need 300 to 350 lbs. of available N, about twice that of 200-bushel corn.

Nitrogen can be applied to soybeans preplant, top dress or foliar if there is a need, but often biological nitrogen fixation by the plant and supplies in the...

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