All Posts from 2016

It’s time to think about applying gypsum in the fall to build soil structure while trapping phosphate on the landscape so it doesn’t end up moving off the field into surface waters.

Gypsum, or calcium sulfate, is best described as a soil ammendment. It contains 20 to 24 percent calcium and 18 to 20 percent sulfate. It has been used in California for decades to remediate sodium and salinity. It is also a source of soluble calcium that...

This past growing season personnel from Southern Illinois University, Iowa State University and University of Illinois evaluated more than 580 soybean varieties from 22 seed companies in USB-sponsored sudden death syndrome (SDS) variety trials. The varieties that were evaluated...

Favorable weather, strong genetics and good on-farm management all contributed to the successful soybean crop in 2016, with record yields in many areas throughout the state.

Emerson Nafziger, Ph.D., professor of crop sciences and extension agronomist at the University of Illinois, discusses this season’s weather patterns and summarizes research focusing on crop rotation, tillage, maturity, plant height, nitrogen application and...

Symptoms of charcoal rot can be mistaken for symptoms of Diaporthe fungi which cause stem canker and pod and stem blight.

The Crop Protection Network has new information on the diagnosis on the soybean stem canker. To start, the Diaporthe-Phomopsis disease complex includes Phomosis seed decay caused by D....

A smile at harvest starts with the good decisions you made before and at planting. Like many row crops, soybeans yields will start to diminish once the bag is opened and seed is placed in the ground. Almost all management practices are implemented to preserve soybean top end yield, not necessarily to increase yield. When implementing a soybean game plan there are several areas to consider during planting; at the end of the day producers must...

It is time for farmers to begin thinking as much about soil health and farming their soil as farming their crop. Doing so will produce short- and long-term benefits to the soil that are huge. And more importantly, yields will begin to increase, crops will be more resilient during stress years and in-field variability will decline at the same time time. And along the way you will probably save money on your fertility program.

Improving...

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