All Posts from September 2016

This post highlights material covered in a breakout session sponsored by BASF at the recent ILSoyAdvisor Field Days. To see other posts in this Field Days recap series, click here

Choosing the right soybean planting date, maturity group, and planting population is like piecing together a puzzle. Because every year is different, it’s important to...

What makes a healthy soybean plant? It’s about what you both see and don’t see. When you want to produce a high-yield crop, pay close attention to plant health.

When I think about soybean health I sit back and think about my own health. A lot of things go into my staying healthy, just as a lot of things go into keeping our soybeans healthy.

When I think of keeping a young child healthy I think about vaccinations helping ward off...

I have to acknowledge there is a new national soybean record and it was in Georgia, not necessarily a soybean-friendly environment like Central Illinois.

We now have an official soybean yield record on a field scale—171.8 bushels—achieved by Randy Dowdy in Georgia. It surpasses the 2010 record of 160.6 bushels set by Kip Cullers in Missouri. Dowdy’s yield was verified on August 29th, 2016, by the University of Georgia Cooperative...

Last month I switched things up and posed this question to some of my customers (twice) with the general consensus that weed control is the #1 challenge when raising soybeans and then received a myriad of responses on the #2 challenge. Therefore, I am going to address some of these other challenges. They are in no particular order of importance.

“LibertyLink® is working well, but now crop injury from the...

This post highlights material covered in a breakout session sponsored by Northern Partners Cooperative at the recent ILSoyAdvisor Field Days. To see other posts in this Field Days recap series, click here

It’s well-known that producing more pods per plant and more seeds per pod results in more yield. But it’s also a fact that soybeans don’t respond well to stress—...

A common frustration growers have with soybeans is the tendency for the grain to get excessively dry (under 10%) on a plant whose stems remain green and tough. When the grain is below 13% moisture we lose yield due to decreased seed weight (water loss) and increased shatter losses. To make matters worse, tough-cutting plants slow harvest and increase fuel consumption. Growers often wonder why the grain and the plant can’t be ready to harvest...

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