All Posts from August 2016

Everyone knows what phosphorus (P) deficiency looks like in corn—purplish color leaves. So it would be easy to expect similar symptoms for soybeans. But it turns out to not be the same. Phosphorus deficiency isn’t as easily identifiable as in corn or as potassium deficiency is in soybean tissue. As an agronomist I must admit that I never thought much about P deficiency symptoms below.

In early July I decided to look...

Dan Arkels was the first soybean producer in Illinois to reach the 100-bushel mark on his farm in Peru, Illinois. In the video below, he provides a summary of what has happened in his Yield Challenge field over the growing season, including the high number of pods per plant and the biostimulants used on the field. What are you doing to break your yield barriers? Let us know in the comments below.

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Will a Japanese beetle breakout this year force growers to spray?  Our advice – scout your fields to see if beetles are a threat and if treatment is warranted.

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Photo courtesy of Eric Ifft, Bayer CropScience

In mid-July I was scouting some...

It’s now official. A survey conducted by the Weed Science Society of America (WSSA) has ranked Palmer amaranth, also known as Palmer pigweed, as the most troublesome weed in the U.S. Weeds in the Galium genus (cleavers, catchweed bedstraw and false cleavers) ranked as the most troublesome in Canada.

“We certainly weren’t surprised to find Palmer amaranth at the top of the U.S. list,” says Lee Van Wychen, Ph.D., science policy director...

Join us on Thursday, August 18th for Agronomy Day! Discover the latest research, technology, and industry data from University of Illinois faculty and staff in the College of ACES. The event will be hosted in a new location: 4202 South First Street in Savoy, Illinois. In addition to a new location, we’ve made many improvements for participants including: disabled parking, shorter walking distances between tours, new faculty speakers, and a...

Scientists have longed dreamed of transferring the nitrogen fixation trait found in soybeans and other legumes to grain crops. Just imagine for a moment all the money growers could save on nitrogen and, by extension, the reduction of nitrogen in surface waters.

Remember that bacteria (rhizobia species) take up residence in the roots, form nodules, take nitrogen out of the air and feed it back to the plant while the plant feeds on...

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