All Posts from May 2016

When looking for a soybean residual herbicide program, I have yet to find one that is a silver bullet for every weed across the board. In my experience, it is harder to select a broad-spectrum soybean herbicide than a broad-spectrum corn herbicide. For a soybean weed control program to work, you have to know what you are fighting against. In a corn weed control program, you can take a more general approach and get by. You need to get your...

No argument from most farmers—it has been wet the past month with frequent rains and brief planting windows. Corn got planted, but soybean planting is behind. No, it is not necessarily late, but yields could be compromised as planting is delayed, particularly as we move into the second half of May.

Fortunately, soybeans have the ability to compensate for stress and “things” that happen to the plant. But it is true that soybean yield...

So you got your beans planted—then it rained and rained and now you’re wondering how your crop “stands?” Or how soybean seeds and emerging seedlings fare when soils become saturated or ponded?

It isn’t uncommon to get heavy rain or frequent rainfall events after planting. The soil profile becomes temporarily saturated for several days—water can actually pond on a field surface for as much as a week if rain continues. So just how long...

I am pleased to have this opportunity to post an editorial on ISA’s ILSoyAdvisor management website. Soybeans are a unique crop whose end product is the production of high levels of protein and oil. When a crusher buys your soybeans, he is less interested in your production level than in how many lbs. of oil and protein he can extract from a bushel.

While yields have increased over the last few decades, general protein levels have gone...

Planting corn or soybeans first, how to prioritize and does it really make a difference?

Waiting after corn planting is done until May 1 to start with soybeans is a tactic from the past. Today many growers start planting in April and some even plant both crops at the same time. Personally, I think that is a good tactic as long as corn can get planted in the April window and growers have the equipment and...

While visiting my customers in Southwest Illinois over the last few weeks, I have noticed pronounced yellow-green areas in the wheat fields. You’re now thinking, “What do problems in wheat have to do with soybeans?” Well, these areas (see photos below) are showing signs of sulfur (S) deficiency that have been confirmed with tissue and soil tests. Remember, S deficiency shows up on the young tissue because it is non-mobile in the plant, unlike...

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