All Posts from May 2016

Can we use drones to better manage our soybean crop? We think so and intend to set out to validate it through a case study in 2016. So stay tuned and learn more.

The last two years we have heard a lot about using drones to capture images of crops and about everything else we can think of. There are a number of aerial platforms available now, some quite inexpensive depending on the type of aircraft and camera. Copters are much less...

The USDA’s May 15 Crop Progress Report states that 36% of U.S. soybeans have been planted as of May 15. In Illinois only 29% of soybean acres have been planted. Planting progress is behind the 43% reported planted at the same time in 2015.

Mike Wilson, Southeast Illinois says:
Here in Southeastern Illinois we have planted very few soybeans (less than 5%) and still have most of our corn to plant. As of this...

Soybean planting has yet to begin in earnest in Kansas, based on the USDA Crop Progress and Condition Report from April 25, 2016. Nonetheless, some farmers have already planted some of their soybeans. These beans have gotten off to a very slow start, constrained by rain events and wet soil conditions.

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The first and most economical approach (a.k.a. save money) to manage many of the pathogens that impact soybean in the state of Ohio is to pick varieties that have the right resistance package. If the resistance is effective – then there is no need for any further measures during the season. The soybean plant can take care of itself, especially during years when conditions are favorable for disease development.

We routinely use both...

Hopefully you got your soybeans planted during your desired window and into good soil conditions.

Your next task is to scout for emergence, emergence consistency and stand counts. Soybeans aren’t as sensitive to emergence consistency as corn. We know that corn seedlings should all emerge at about the same time, or with 1 or 2 days of each other, so they compete equally and set an equal sized ear.

Soybeans, on the other hand, are...

In 2014, Dan Arkels, soybean farmer from Peru, Illinois, became the first verified 100-plus bushel soybean grower in Illinois with 104 bushels beans. In 2015, Jason and Robert Lakey topped his record yield with a bin-busting 108 bushels. Now, Arkels wants his top producer title back. With beans planted on April 17, he’s gunning for 150 bushels this season. Listen to Arkels discuss his approach below.

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