All Posts from April 2016

Most farmers I know work like dogs from the first dry day in March through the time corn is “laid by,” usually around the 4th of July. After that, the corn has pollinated most years and it is time to mow roadsides, county fair time and time for family vacations. But with soybeans, the time to really emphasize management has just begun. One of the most frequent questions I get from growers is “Why can’t I grow better beans than I did 10 years...

We have conducted numerous studies over the last 10 years on soybean seeding rates. In almost all instances, we rarely observed a response to rates above 150,000 seeds/acre.

In 2015, we examined the response of soybean under high input management (~200,000 seeds/acre with a fungicide/insecticide seed treatment as well as a foliar fungicide, Priaxor, applied at 4 fluid oz. /acre on 7/31 at the R3 stage) compared with...

Going into 2016 growers are working hard to manage input costs to accommodate today’s low commodity prices, along with their expected yield, in order to return a profit. A lot of ”economic type” questions have come up this past winter surrounding seed selection and seed treatment needs, particularly on soybeans.

Soybean seed treatments have become standard throughout the industry to protect developing soybean plants from yield- and...

We all know that this year is going to be a year of managing risk and production costs. We always face a risk when farming, as we rely on our weather to bless us with a crop to harvest. However, this year we are also carrying a heavy burden of financial risk as well. With +/-$9 soybeans and what seems like higher input costs, every decision we make in our operations is a risk. With risk there is also reward and we need to figure out what our...

Winter annual weeds may be larger this year compared with recent years

Warm soil temperatures and minimal moisture are creating the perfect storm for heightened weed pressure this spring. As a result, annual weeds are likely to emerge earlier than the past few years because soil temperatures are already warming up, says Kent Bennis, market development specialist, Dow AgroSciences.

“Lambsquarters is...

Been quite this spring in Illinois. Spring came early in March, but then disappeared for a few weeks when it turned cold, snowy and wet. Well, spring is back now and appears ready to stay, so it’s time to plant.

CCA Soy Envoy and Monsanto Agronomist Lance Tarochione blogged earlier on planting date and when to plant soybeans. Two things we know are that soybeans are being planted earlier and growers are equipping themselves to plant...

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