All Posts from 2015

I could have easily dropped the soybean part of the title. There’s a lot of hand-wringing going on about what do to in 2016. It starts with current commodity prices multiplied by an average yield, with the result being a number that most producers say is below break-even. That’s when the overthinking begins. What to cut, where to cut, why cut and what to do with what’s left? I have heard some wild ideas and wild plans this fall as some try to...

ISA hosted its first regional ILSoyAdvisor Field Days this past summer. From August 4-6, we brought soybean experts to fields around the state to share the latest information, tools and technology that are producing higher yields and better profitability. Watch the video below to see how adjuvants can help you get the most out of your foliar applications, and view other presentations...

Some growers will decide to plant back to back soybeans because of recent grain market outlooks. Most sources say that if a grower chooses to go with a continuous soybean rotation, they should expect potential yield losses between 5 to 20% compared to a corn after soybean rotation. This yield loss gradually increases, the longer a field is planted back to only soybeans.

However, some Illinois research revealed that yield loss was not...

2015 was the sixth year of ISA’s Yield Challenge for Illinois soybean growers. The program encourages producers to adopt good management practices to increase their yields and overcome whatever challenges they may face. ISA’s Yield Challenge Marketing Coordinator, Jim Nelson, discusses how the Yield Challenge keeps Illinois soybeans competitive in the global market and can help improve farmers’ bottom line. 

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Planting cover crops can lessen the risk of yield drag on second-year soybeans, and planting them after soybean harvest gives you an opportunity to plant earlier in the fall and into low residue and good soil conditions.

There is some interest in growing more soybeans and even planting some fields back to second-year soybeans. There is some risk of yield drag (4 to 5%), so growers interested in this rotation need to plant soybeans back...

Despite low expectations, many growers saw above average yields this season, usually between 50 and 70 bu/ac. Lance Tarochione, CCA, provides an in-depth explanation of what producers saw this year and gives his insight on how farmers managed to grow high-yielding soybeans despite all of the factors working against them. He also reminds producers to plant early and have a strong weed control program in place for 2016.

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