All Posts from November 2015

Here is the second installment with additional considerations for weed management in 2016.

Resistance remains
Herbicide-resistant weed populations continue to be a common occurrence across most areas of Illinois. Waterhemp and horseweed (marestail) are the two most common herbicide-resistant weed species in Illinois, and observations during 2015 suggest these species are likely to remain prevalent in 2016....

The biggest question I get asked now that all the soybeans have been harvested is, what lessons did we learn and what can growers do differently next year? My answer would usually include a joke about not using as much water. However, despite having too much rain last year, the soybeans didn’t seem to suffer as much as expected based on final yields.

Tillage is the first thing that I would address in the answer. No-till soybeans have...

Wow, what a year the 2015 season has been! From the start, farmers were challenged by weather events that staggered early season growth. We were no different at Beck’s new Southern Illinois Practical Farm Research site in Effingham. Transitioning from a traditional farm that still had cattle and chickens on it in April, to a full-fledged research farm was a huge accomplishment in a short amount of time. Like others in the area, we experienced...

It is not too early to think about how you are going to control weeds in 2016. Many of you will remember how ineffective early weed control was last spring due to all the rain that either prevented spraying or diluted the impact of residual herbicides.

We all know that you can no longer rely on glyphosate to control all weeds and that programs today need either a burndown, a residual or another post as a tank mix with glyphosate. In...

Hopefully there are no soybeans still in the field at this point in Illinois. Even the double crop soybeans should be out by now. So soybean management is done for the season. And while you might thinking of heading south to sunny shores for the winter, take some time to start preparing for 2016.

Setting the stage for yield really begins with the soil—which begins with soil sampling and a measurement of soil health. Fall is the time to...

Providing adequate amounts of phosphorous and potassium nutrition can help soybean plants reach their potential yield. When these nutrients are deficient in the soil, the plants cannot reach their maximum potential and it will be reflected in the yield. Dr. Robert Mullen, Director of Agronomy with Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan, explains the importance of phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) in the soil, provides tips for a fertilizer...

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