All Posts from September 2015

This summer’s cool and wet weather created conditions favorable for the development of white mold. Consequently, the disease has infected soybean fields across the state. With careful management, growers can significantly reduce the amount of 2015 white mold inoculum that will be available to infect future susceptible crops grown in the infested fields.

White mold inoculum is contained in small, black survival structures called...

The challenges for 2015 continue to develop. Another issue growers are facing is green stemed soybeans. There are two distinct types of green stems, Green Stem Syndrome or simply stay green soybeans. In the case of stay green, the soybeans simply mature at a slower rate and the stems, leaves and pods all remain green. Stay green can be attributed to varietal differences, fungicide applications or some herbicide applications. In the case of...

Hello from District 2.

Soybeans are really starting to change color quickly here in District 2. Temperatures were very high a couple weeks ago and are now back to normal for this time of year. Some of the later planted soybeans are still green and benefitted greatly from the last couple rain events we’ve had, something I can’t say for the earlier ones. Beans planted in late April and early May are starting to drop leaves now. This is...

Now that harvest 2015 has started, let’s look at some of the things we have learned during this growing season.

1. Variety selection is still one of the most critical choices we make in soybean production: The weather this year again made it obvious that the correct maturity, a strong disease package and SCN resistance for a farmer can be a deal maker or breaker. One of the best assets to your farm is a good seedsman that knows his...

This year with all the wet weather and a lack of good weed control in many areas, many farmers are asking about using a harvest aid to help kill weeds prior to soybean harvest. In many fields we have soybeans that are turning yet waterhemp, cocklebur and some grasses are still very green. Removing this green matter will aid in harvest as well as removing storage risk.

There are options for harvest aids in soybeans, but there are a few...

“Avoid harvesting soybeans” too dry is almost a cliché and a seemingly impossible task. Growers try to start combining when beans are 14% or so (no one wants a moisture discount), but before they know it moisture drops from 14 to 12 to 10 and even 8% moisture on a sunny, warm and windy fall day. Even with best intentions soybeans dry down quickly each day once mature.

To avoid moisture discounts from the quoted market price per bushel...

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