All Posts from 2014

Farmers deal with uncertainty on a regular basis, from fluctuations in weather to changes in market demand. But lower commodity prices and higher input costs pose a new challenge—staying profitable in a tough business climate.

“We need to focus more on the financial management of the business than we have in recent years,” says Mike Boehlje, Ph.D., professor of agricultural economics at Purdue University. In the kickoff episode of “...

This year I assisted in verifying plot results for the 100 Bushel Challenge, a program encouraging soybean producers to experiment with new production techniques. Because of the importance of ensuring accurate results, harvest must be witnessed and validated, requiring two independent verifications to qualify.

How the Verification Process Works

The verification process includes harvesting a minimum of two acres...

Do soybeans respond to sulfur? That is a question that has been on my mind recently. Do we really know if they do, and if so, what is the best way to provide it? Understanding whether soybeans respond to sulfur is a bit like understanding how soybeans respond to nitrogen. Response depends on growth and yield potential, nitrogen fixation, available and mineralizable sulfate and the weather.

Soybeans, like all crops, require sulfur (S)....

What does it take to be considered improved environmental steward at the farm gate?  Is it a focus on water quality, an environmental footprint, production of sustainable food, soil health or planting cover crops? We all have a different point of view on this question.

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Illinois growers are encouraged to attend a new webinar series from the Illinois Soybean Association. The checkoff-funded program will highlight best management practices in soybean production and will offer practical tips for improving yields and profitability for the 2015 growing season.

The three-part webinar series kicks off December 3 on www.ILSoyAdvisor.com with a recap of the 2014...

Farmers rarely store many bushels of soybeans. If they have on-farm storage they want to use it for corn. Besides, there has rarely been much carry in the soybean market to make it worth storing beans, considering that you have to handle the bushels twice.  But then some growers do store some beans on-farm and hold them for later delivery for cash flow purposes. 

As with corn or wheat, spoilage will occur quickly if storage moisture...

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