All Posts from March 2014

During the last 100 years, we have seen numerous changes and challenges in the soybean global marketplace.  For Illinois soybeans to stay competitive in the next 100 years, new approaches that address challenges—locally AND globally—are needed. Your checkoff dollars are already hard at work to address market access and policy barriers on the international scale. We’re responding to these barriers, so you can focus on your farm.

Today,...

Soybeans once flew under the radar.  Not anymore.  This magical bean has come a long way since its quiet start in Illinois 100 years ago; times and technologies have changed significantly and will continue to do so.  Harnessing these news tools and technologies will be key to making soybeans an even higher value crop.  Gaining more value will require a shift in mindset and new approaches to better manage your soybean acres.

This new...

How much profit potential are you willing to lose to weeds in 2014?  It’s easy to underestimate the amount of yield loss to weeds, but when they compete with your crops for sunlight, moisture and nutrients, the effects of even a small patch can add up.  In fact, it’s been estimated that weeds rob enough yield potential worldwide to feed nearly 1 billion people.  So don’t let them take a bite out of your profits.  Be sure to start early, plan...

There’s no telling how spring 2014 will go. In 2012, beans were planted very early; in 2013, very late. The important lesson learned is that the days of planting by the calendar are over.

While it can be tempting to get in the field early, here are some important points to consider to ensure you’ve prepared the best possible seedbed for your soybeans.

Consider soil temperature

While some researchers will...

Yield potential is never as high as the day your soybeans are planted.  Thanks to the advances of modern soybean genetics, soybeans now come packed with greater yield potential and built-in resistance to herbicides, diseases and pests than ever before.  But realizing the full potential of these genetic powerhouses requires a strong start from the very beginning of the growing season.

What’s the secret to starting strong?...

While the drought of 2012 may not be top-of-mind as you head into 2014, don’t overlook the impact it may have on your 2014 soybean crop.

How so?

According to Greg Tylka, Iowa State University, the 2012 drought may have contributed to higher than normal levels of SCN. “In 2012, extremely high SCN reproduction was reported, most likely due to the drought conditions that year.”

Because many of those fields were in corn in...

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